Validating numeric input

So as a software developer you should know that there are two types of users, Also imagine that you have a web application and there is a form to add a new article, this form contains a text box to enter the title of the article which will render as a label when the users will read the article, if one of the users write “Some text” in the field, this will cause a big problem because when the users will open the article instead of seeing the title they will see a link that is maybe a dangerous link.

So checking what users write in your app fields is very important aspect to build a robust and secure apps.

You will learn more about input restrictions in the next chapter.Instead, it will display a message that is generated by the web browser itself.Note that the label also displays “(required)”, to inform users that don’t use assistive technology or use older web browsers that do not support the HTML5 attribute informs assistive technologies about required controls so that they are appropriately announced to the users (as opposed to validating the input).In this article I’ll try to explain what regular expression is and how you can use its class in your C# app to validate a user input. A regular expression is a specific pattern used to parse and find matches in strings. A regular expression is sometimes called regex or regexp. \.[a-z A-Z]$ “ matches an email address, so you can use this pattern to validate if a specific string is equals to a valid email address or not. Regual Expressions namespace So let’s start, Now you can fill the fields then click check button, if there is any invalid data a message box will appear and tell you.

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Most often, the purpose of data validation is to ensure correct user input.

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  1. Scholarship has viewed the book of Hosea as originating in eighth-century Israel before being taken to Judah, where it underwent one or more redactions in later centuries. The post-monarchic period in Yehud provides the most fitting context for the anti-monarchical ideology of the book, with the polemic against Benjamin explicable only as a result of the tension between the governing Saulides resident in Mizpah and the Judahite elite who had recently immigrated to Jerusalem from Mesopotamia in the late sixth century.